PROBLEMS WE SOLVE

PROBLEMS WE SOLVE

Forefoot Pain

Pain at the forefoot can be extremely limiting and frustrating as it impairs our ability to walk, carry out daily activities, and do the things we love. Conditions that result in forefoot pain vary greatly, and are often linked with increased pressure at the forefoot that overload our bones, joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments. This means that they can also usually be effectively managed by improving foot function and redistributing pressure more evenly.

 

Learn more about forefoot pain here:

How does pain develop and how can we prevent it?

 

Bunionette (Tailor’s Bunion)

Bunionette (Tailor’s Bunion)

A bunionette is a bony bump that develops on the side of the little (fifth) toe at the ball of the foot. It is very similar to bunions, which are more common and occur at the big toe, apart from their location on the outside of the foot and the involvement of a smaller joint.

Bunions (Hallux Abducto Valgus)

Bunions (Hallux Abducto Valgus)

If there’s a big bony bump at your big toe joint that may rub against the sides of your foot and cause redness, blisters or pain, then you may have a bunion. You’ll also likely struggle to fit into narrow footwear.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a common cause of pain at the big toe joint and describes the inflammation around two small bones that are located beneath that joint, aptly named the sesamoids.

Hammer Toes

Hammer Toes

Beginning as a slight deformity of the toe, hammertoes are little toes that bend at the end joint. This most commonly occurs to the second toe. You’ll notice them because they look like they’re starting to curl downwards.

Claw Toes

Claw Toes

Claw toes are a toe deformity similar to a hammertoe but with a few distinguishable differences. Claw toes, like hammertoes, describe the bent position of the toes that looks like the toe is curling down.

Metatarsalgia

Metatarsalgia

Metatarsalgia describes pain and inflammation in the ball of the foot, and is a common symptom of several foot conditions. Injuries to the ball of the foot occur frequently in athletes who perform activities that put high-impact stress on the forefront of the foot.

Two weeks with Calcaneal Spur and finally got to see Doc. He sent me to Kevin @ Eleven and with One Appointment, he had me walking without Crutches. Yes! It still hurt. Did the Stretching, Rolling my Foot on a Spikey ball and Iced it occasionally. Return visit, after he had his Holiday, and I' am walking fine. They do NOT want to see me again, unless it deteriorates. Which it has not :-)
- Ivan CooKe