PROBLEMS WE SOLVE

PROBLEMS WE SOLVE

Leg Pain

Problems with the legs are often painful, frustrating, limiting and can have a significant negative effect on a person's quality of life. More often than not, causes of leg pain are biomechanical and can be resolved through timely and appropriate treatment.

To learn more about how pain develops in the feet and legs and how we can prevent it, check out this video:
 

 

To read about the importance of warming up for your legs, click here: Why Warm Up

 

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (ACL)

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (ACL)

Your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located in the knee joint and connects to the tibia (shin bone) and the femur (thigh bone). It crosses diagonally with the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) to control the backward and forward movement at the joint. It stops the tibia from sliding forwards on the femur.
Compartment Syndrome (Acute and Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome)

Compartment Syndrome (Acute and Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome)

Compartment syndrome occurs from increased pressure in a muscle compartment. The muscles of the legs are separated into compartments and are surrounded by a connective tissue (fascia).
Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS) describes damage to the iliotibial band (ITB) where it crosses the outside of the knee.
Knock Knees (Genu Valgum)

Knock Knees (Genu Valgum)

‘Knock knees’ describes the positioning of the knees where they turn in towards toward each other. This means that they’re prone to ‘knocking’ or brushing against each other during walking.
Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury (LCL)

Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury (LCL)

Your lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is a narrow and strong ligament on the outside (lateral aspect) of the knee. It attaches to the top of the shin bone (tibia) to the bottom of the thigh bone (femur) at the knee. It resists forces and impact to the inside of the knee (varus forces).
Medial Collateral Ligament Injury (MCL)

Medial Collateral Ligament Injury (MCL)

Your medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a large flat ligament band on the inner side of the knee joint. It attaches to the top of the shin bone (tibia) to the bottom of the thigh bone (femur), working to support and stabilise the knee.
Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)

PFPS is a painful condition affecting the knee that will affect 25% of people at some point in their lives. It’s even more common in runners, hence being known as runner’s knee.
Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (PCL)

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (PCL)

Your posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is located within the knee joint and connects to the tibia (shin bone) and the femur (thigh bone). It crosses over diagonally with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and stops the tibia from sliding backwards on the femur, as well as preventing the tibia from twisting outwards.
Shin Splints (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)

Shin Splints (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)

Clinically referred to as medial tibial stress syndrome, shin splints describe pain that develops at the front of the shin bone (tibia). It’s caused by excess stress and strain to the shins which may occur in multiple ways.

Two weeks with Calcaneal Spur and finally got to see Doc. He sent me to Kevin @ Eleven and with One Appointment, he had me walking without Crutches. Yes! It still hurt. Did the Stretching, Rolling my Foot on a Spikey ball and Iced it occasionally. Return visit, after he had his Holiday, and I' am walking fine. They do NOT want to see me again, unless it deteriorates. Which it has not :-)
- Ivan CooKe